elise's reading log

For some reason, dying men always ask questions they know the answer to. Perhaps it’s so they can die being right.

—Death, The Book Thief (via jnkirschtein)

(via infinatestate)

The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out of the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson

I read this book over the Christmas break as a light-hearted, amusing read, and I found it just that. It’s a comical story, but with real depth and emotion, with history tied in through the whole book. I really enjoyed this book, albeit not very memorable.

Text Type: Novel

Audience: Young adults/Adults

Purpose: to entertain

http://www.radiotimes.com/news/2014-01-01/sherlock-steven-moffat-interviews-benedict-cumberbatch

This was an interview of Benedict Cumberbatch by the writer of Sherlock, Steven Moffat. It was put online after the Series 3 premiere, and the two spoke about Benedict’s role and acting fame since Sherlock started 4 year ago. It was intriguing to see an interview in this way, as the two are obviously very familiar with each other. 

Text Type: Interview

Audience: Sherlock/Benedict Cumberbatch fans

Purpose: to entertain

likeafieldmouse:

Tilda Swinton - The Maybe (2013)

"A gentle refusal of explanation and the element of surprise is integral to the piece. There is no schedule for the random appearances, no artist’s or museum statement besides the simple label on the wall nearby. 

It is an open question, a proposal, a treasure hunt. The title is perhaps the main clue. Yet if we are to be investigators in this mystery and look hard enough we may find some other leads.

The iconic image of Swinton in the glass case has come to represent a signature moment in the exploration of the links between the ‘live’ (performance art) and the ‘death’ of the gallery space (its tendency to freeze in time and space that which is displayed there).

Later, an email from Swinton…provides some further insight. ‘I asked myself to propose a gesture, a hybrid between that essence which I value most in live performance – namely, that kinetic experience of human beings all (wholly – as in, every part of them) present together in the same space at the same time and in the thrall of time and the unexpected – with that essence which I value most in cinematic performance – namely, the possibility of the scrutiny by the viewer of the unwatched who cannot watch back.[…]’

Swinton cites further inspirations. Among them are powerful childhood memories of pretending to be asleep, the archetypal image of the sleeping woman in myths and fairy tales, a sensitivity to the predicament of countless homeless people who seem to be treated by society as if, sleeping rough, they were sealed away – invisible – behind glass and the dominance of the dead in glass boxes displayed for the glory of religion and art – exemplified by both Christian and Communist reliquaries but also Damien Hirst’s pickled carcasses.

Swinton presents a present, living human being alongside these images of passivity, but as both subject and object – and author/artist. The most commonly asked question by spectators of The Maybe – now, as eighteen years ago – is ‘Is it real?’”

This is a short article about Tilda Swinton’s recent exhibition of ‘living art’. 

Audience: adults, art enthusiasts
Purpose: to inform, to inspire, to provoke thought
Text Type: Article

(via chekovitout)

This is an extract from Struck by Lightning, a rewriting of the movie of the same name by Chris Colfer, a 22-year-old actor and singer (and writer) best known for his role as Kurt on Glee. I read this book when it came out after seeing the movie, and although I didn’t enjoy it, it was relatable and had some really mature and sensitive points. 
Audience: Teenagers/YAPurpose: to entertainText Type: novel adaption of a movie

This is an extract from Struck by Lightning, a rewriting of the movie of the same name by Chris Colfer, a 22-year-old actor and singer (and writer) best known for his role as Kurt on Glee. I read this book when it came out after seeing the movie, and although I didn’t enjoy it, it was relatable and had some really mature and sensitive points. 

Audience: Teenagers/YA
Purpose: to entertain
Text Type: novel adaption of a movie

(Source: veeisveryextraordinary, via buttersmanyparsnips)

“In English,” Professor Austin said, “a double negative forms a positive. However, in some languages, such as Russian, a double negative remains a negative. But there isn’t a single language, not one, in which a double positive can express a negative.”

A voice from the back of the room piped up, “Yeah, right.”

Once, Picasso was asked what his paintings meant. He said, “Do you ever know what the birds are singing? You don’t. But you listen to them anyway.” So, sometimes with art, it is important just to look.

—Marina Abramović (via monarchie)

(Source: kingoftheclubkids, via watsonjohn)

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Fahrenheit 451 is a dystopian novel in which books are outlawed, and ‘fireman’ have the jobs of burning any they find. It was written in 1953 and has a similar feel to 1984 by George Orwell. 
Purpose: to entertainAudience: adultsText Type: novel
I found this book amazing. The concept, as well as the writing, were so captivating, and for a short book, it made me think and had incredible undertones and hidden messages. 

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451 is a dystopian novel in which books are outlawed, and ‘fireman’ have the jobs of burning any they find. It was written in 1953 and has a similar feel to 1984 by George Orwell. 

Purpose: to entertain
Audience: adults
Text Type: novel

I found this book amazing. The concept, as well as the writing, were so captivating, and for a short book, it made me think and had incredible undertones and hidden messages.